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Export to 3D PDF

Greetings from first time poster.
I'm trying to export a 3D PDF file from a 9Mb DWG file.
A third party did the same by converting to DGN then exporting to 3D PDF from Microstation.
Their 3D PDF file is about 2.1Mb
When I exported from BricsCAD communicator with the default settings, my file was 21Mb.
I fiddled with the settings, knocking all of the DPI settings from 300 to 76 & my new file was 22Mb (!)
Can anybody here advise me which settings to adjust in order to reduce my file size by 90%?

Comments

  • Hmmm.
    That sinking feeling you get when you realise you've shelled out for the wrong software. :(

  • I did a quick search and found that there are some 3rd party programs that can do the conversion. Some are online, and you pay per drawing.

    I have not used any of them but here is a paid one I found, https://www.convertcadfiles.com/

    And here is a free online one. http://www.zamzar.com/convert/dwg-to-pdf/

    As with anything online, you might want to be careful what you are doing. Sometimes they try to sneak another program as a download. Even the big companies, like Adobe does this constantly.

    -Joe

  • @MACJXL said:
    Greetings from first time poster.
    I'm trying to export a 3D PDF file from a 9Mb DWG file.
    A third party did the same by converting to DGN then exporting to 3D PDF from Microstation.
    Their 3D PDF file is about 2.1Mb
    When I exported from BricsCAD communicator with the default settings, my file was 21Mb.
    I fiddled with the settings, knocking all of the DPI settings from 300 to 76 & my new file was 22Mb (!)
    Can anybody here advise me which settings to adjust in order to reduce my file size by 90%?

    I was curious and exported one of my bigger DWG's (22.5MB) to 3D PDF. (We have BricsCAD V 17.2.08 and the current version of Communicator.) The resultant PDF was 6.6MB. The colors were screwed up. The lower half of he housing should have been blue. Take a look. I don't know where the settings are for 3D pdf, but the attached screenshot shows the general PDF settings I was using.

    pdf
    pdf
    Assembly (3D).pdf
    6M
    PDF Options.jpg
    1440 x 900 - 389K
  • I have the same issue in the 2D Basic version;
    PDF export makes a file about twice as big as the dwg
    I am not cdertain that was happening before v16

    -T

  • @Jim Canale said:

      I still wonder if my other approach (physically flattening the chassis, and scanning it on a 2D scanner would offer the best results. That process would give me a "developed blank"   The material is soft, thin aluminum.  But I am not sure I could do this without  stretching the material.  I also don't know what kind of accuracy I could get from a 2D scanner, and whether I could accurately stitch scans together.  The part will be too big for an 8 1/2" x 11" scanner. 


    Upon re-reading the thread, I agree that this may be the best option. Sheet metal work is not a process that is considered highly accurate. Yes, there may be some distortion, but you will probably need to do some test parts and then adjust dimensions if necessary.

    For a time I was creating 3D CAD models for a theater. (attached is an image of one of their more recent productions to get a sense of its scale). My job was to design the internal metal framework of the set pieces. I would start by measuring a small model of a theatrical set piece. I briefly considered a 3D laser scanner, But, I immediately realized that I wanted to model to have walls that were perfectly flat, and perpendicular to the floor. And if something were 6.1 " from an edge, I was strongly motivated to change that to be 6" exactly. .... well unless that 0.1" of space was for clearance to another part that had to go there at a later time. No machine is capable of making those kinds of decisions.

    In other words, I really did not want to accurately re-create the object. I just wanted the tools to make it faster for me to re-interpret the object, and make it easy to interrupt the process to insert my own design skills. There were some parts of the object that didn't need to be very accurately reproduced. These were areas like the part of the set that depicted the perimeter of the ground around a rolling set.

    For your work, you have a part that is known to work well. Ideally, you would exactly reproduce it. But, keep in mind that even if the part works, it is not really produced as it was drawn. There are always manufacturing variations. Ideally, you would want to model the original design intent. But, sometimes that is not possible to really recreate, nor necessary.

    For my theatrical modeling, I ended up buying a small, used, MicroScribe digitizing arm for $600. I also had a small end-tip created to attach to the MicroScribe, to make it easier to point to a corner of two walls and get the theoretical corner.

    Before obtaining the MicroScribe, one method I used to measure a set piece with an irregular base, was to simply place the base of the object on a 2D scanner, and then I imported the image into my CAD system. After scaling it properly, I just traced.

    As for the scanning of a 2D part, tabloid sized scanners are not uncommon. This makes it easier to do larger sizes. Just look for a Tabloid sized multi-function office machine. The scanner part is probably 11"x17". But, stitching works well also. Just add some marks that will show up on the overlap areas if the area doesn't have any detail.

    I have also used digital cameras for "scanning" a large object. But, they introduce some distortion, so it is advisable to use a telephoto lens and get as far away as you can from the object. This can greatly reduce the distortion. There are ways to adjust for distortions in image editing software, and you might draw straight lines across your part to help facilitate this process.

    With the 2D scan, don't expect a push-button solution. Rather, use the image as a guide that you trace over, and then edit the dimensions to have them make more sense. E.g. a 0.501" diameter hole is probably better modeled as 1/2".

    Your own work flow and tools will, of course, need to be chosen to work well for your own situation. But, this can take a long time to really refine, and will probably take a more time than you expect.

    Sight-Sound Moses 2014.jpg
    960 x 640 - 69K
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Origami is the Japanese word for paper folding. ORI means to fold and KAMI means paper and involves the creation of paper forms usually entirely by folding.

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