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Best Linux Distro and Windowing System

Hi,

Is there a preferred Linux distribution to use and windowing system, when it comes to performance and stability?

Thanks,
Mike

Comments

  • Or which Linux to choose if you come from the Mac side.

    Should have an appealing (reduced) GUI
    (e.g. I like Windows 10's look, I think macOS is a bit outdated)
    Not necessary a Copy of Mac UI functions, like its Dock or such things.

    I don't screw much in my OS itself like I did while my previous Windows
    times a decade ago. But I should be able to find and access all Settings
    and Config Files of my Apps.
    Is there any difference between Distributions concerning File Structure
    and OS Settings at all ?

    Expected use is mainly CAD, 3D, Graphics and a little Internet and Office.
    (So far my Bricscad and Modo would support Linux)

    And it should be save against user errors and secure,
    as long as I am no Linux Expert, if I would get that at all.

  • ZakZak
    edited March 8

    Most window managers are fast, if you want something elegant go with DWM otherwise I recommend KDE's window manager along with its DE as well and if you really want speed choose gentoo because everything is built according to your preferences and the code is optimised for your hardware.

  • Sorry for my very low level questions.

    Is the hardware support and drivers a kernel thing and so same
    for all distributions ?

    So there is a hand full of Window Managers available where Distributions
    support 1 or more (Ubuntu vs Kubuntu ?) of these,
    and Distributions differ only in the graphical look and the software they
    add or bundle with ?
    Or is Software for Linux not necessarily running on all Distributions ?

  • @Michael Mayer said:
    Sorry for my very low level questions.

    Is the hardware support and drivers a kernel thing and so same
    for all distributions ?

    So there is a hand full of Window Managers available where Distributions
    support 1 or more (Ubuntu vs Kubuntu ?) of these,
    and Distributions differ only in the graphical look and the software they
    add or bundle with ?
    Or is Software for Linux not necessarily running on all Distributions ?

    The distributions all use the same drivers, for graphics its mesa, and kernel drm, fbcon, kms things which you will learn if you install gentoo because you have to choose them to make your system work.

  • Thanks Zak,
    that helps a lot.
    Just the moment I try to google such basic information about Linux
    but so far tumble mostly over command line videos :)
    I also follow the Linux threads on Modo forums but currently miss the
    most basic knowledge and terms to be able to follow :)

    Is Linux similar to Windows, opposed to Mac, concerning that totally
    outdated Software will still run on current OS ?
    Or more in the kind of that after updating your kernel, Bricscad may
    suddenly no more work ?

  • ZakZak
    edited March 9

    @Michael Mayer said:
    Thanks Zak,
    that helps a lot.
    Just the moment I try to google such basic information about Linux
    but so far tumble mostly over command line videos :)
    I also follow the Linux threads on Modo forums but currently miss the
    most basic knowledge and terms to be able to follow :)

    Is Linux similar to Windows, opposed to Mac, concerning that totally
    outdated Software will still run on current OS ?
    Or more in the kind of that after updating your kernel, Bricscad may
    suddenly no more work ?

    I can testify to "old software" that in the kernel reside drivers for things which should be considered reliks and completely obsolete. Some of them are frame relay, isdn and token ring drivers there are many more, as far as software, there are tons of softwares available which are ancient and some even written for unix which will run fine, or with some modifications. If you want to learn linux I suggest linux from scratch or gentoo. You DO NOT need to know command line to install gentoo what you really do need is to be is VERY good at taking and following instructions.

  • Thanks Zak, that is what I like to hear.
    That is where I see myself as a potential user.
    Since switching from Windows to Mac I do no more care about my OS
    and peripheral Software, I only care about my Pro Software and settings.
    When there is an internal problem I usually google and simply drag and drop
    commands into Terminal.
    So currently I have peripheral Software from App Store which will be updated
    together with the OS by Apple.
    Windows 10 does similar today and generally I like its features and UI but
    not Microsofts draw backs.

    So if Linux allows to avoid command line and be controlled from the graphical
    interface, and peripheral software like office and web will be cared of by a
    Package Manager (as I remember), Linux sounds quite ok for me.

    There are still 2 concerns from the last tests years ago.
    a) I easily managed to destroy the installation into a non bootable state and
    had to start from scratch a few times.
    b) Will I be able to keep it secure if I have no real clue with things like which
    ports to block in a firewall or which I need and such things.

    But I found some interesting Videos now and bookmarked some hours of
    learning that I will go through first.

  • edited March 10

    OK, got a little overview now.

    Things like Gentoo or Arch are not for me as a beginner.
    I think it is about distros like :
    Mint
    Elementary
    Ubuntu Studio
    Manjaro
    and maybe even
    OpenSuse or there was an Arch derivate with pre packaging.

    For the GUI I think I prefer (?) KDE
    and hope wayland is already usable.

    Normally (K)Ubuntu would be a no brainer,
    but if going especially Linux - no data collection needed from my side.
    And a little worried about free vs open source, to not run into issues
    as a "commercial" user.

  • Apologies for my late remarks, but I'm running BricsCAD v17 for Linux in two platforms. It actually runs quite well in OpenSuse Leap 42.2 though it looks like an upgrade to 42.3 is necessary. Though not recommended, I'm told, I actually run OpenSuse in Virtualbox as my desktop is Gentoo. Hardware is i7-4770k with memory maxed out and a nVidia Quadro. My other machine is a Dell Latitude d620. BricsCAD does run on it, but due to less than 4GB of memory 3D seems a bit problematic. The Dell works well for general work, but I decided to move my BricsCAD to an MSI W63 which has 32GB ram and an i7-770HQ CPU to allow BricsCAD more memory. I doubt it will be less than my desktop.

  • edited March 22

    I also played a bit with Linux now.
    I also use Linux on a VM (Parallels)

    Unfortunately I currently have old OS X 10.7.5 here for now,
    so also Parallels very old and the support for Linux Versions
    is years behind.
    (And worse than VMWare in general ?)

    What I would like is Kubuntu 17.x and I tested and like it.
    But without Parallels Tools installed VW will not apply a real fake GPU
    so it works in VGA 800x600 only which is not much fun.
    I tried to install Parallels Tools on Kubuntu later but unfortunately it
    refuses to install the outdated Parallels Tools.
    I will try a more recent KDE Version when I am back at my workstation
    with current OS + Parallels.

    So for now I installed one of the latest legacy Suse Distributions i could
    find for Download. This runs kind of Fullscreen with old Parallels Tools.
    Not without Screen Distortion though. And I don't like that green Suse UI ;)
    But I can play and get used to a Linux OS for now.

    And a new question from a Mac user,
    how do I update a Linux to a new Version ?
    Just like on Mac, download a recent version and start it from the current
    Linux, install it over and it will ask to migrate Settings ?
    Can I do that directly from a years old legacy Linux to a recent version
    or should this done step by step from version to version ?

  • OK, back again with current Mac Pro, macOS and latest Parallels.
    I was able to get my Parallels Tools installed on the latest Kubunto
    and everything smooth and full screen now.
    I really like Linux and so far no problems or accidents.

    Not much Software installed so far beside Blender and Gimp.
    So I can start trying Bricscad and Modo on Linux.

  • edited March 28

    Hmmh,
    I installed latest Bricscad successfully, can open it but it is not
    willing to interact with me.

    Is Bricscad compatible with Kubuntu 17.10, KDE, Wayland, QT, ....
    Parallels VM providing OpenGL 2.1 only (?)

    Modo runs a bit better - it just will not show anything in View Windows ....
    But Blender runs fine.

  • So OpenGL or fake GPU provided by Parallels Virtual Machine,
    opposed to a Windows VM, is not sufficient under Linux to
    run Bricscad or Modo.

    So I bootet a real Linux Kubuntu from an USB Stick and Bricscad
    runs (mostly) fine.

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