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4K Screen Grab to test monitors

I want to buy a 4K monitor, and want to check out what they look like when Displaying CAD drawings. Since the displays are set to show their demo images, and not line art, the sales rep said he would be willing to use the USB connection that many of them have, to bring up a CAD drawing.

Comments

  • Nice! I know you can get monitors specifically for cad. That might be the way to go.
    I was looking on line a while go and spotted some pretty awesome units.

    It does make a bid difference, especially in the blue on black colours. At least for me.

    I narrowed my search down to two, cant remember what they were now. One was an Asus.

    By the way, I didn't end up getting new monitor. But thanks for reminding me...

  • How many computers have you got. I just had a thought. If you've got a small laptop you can but BricsCAD on that and plug it into the hdmi of the monitors at the shop.
    I recently got a Lenovo Miix for show and tell, and used my Licence to put BricsCAD onto that also. So if you've got a small laptop put CAD on it and take it to the shops. You could even load draftsight onto it if you can't get bricscad onto it.

  • Dfly, While I have a laptop, and have done the setup you mention in the past. I connected it to an external HD display at 1920x1080. It worked quite well for several years. But I now only use a desktop system for CAD work. And for anyone hoping to do this, be sure to check out if your laptop is even capable of 4k.

    Today I purchased an Acer 32" EB321HQU monitor. It is 2560x1440 resolution. Also known as 2k or QHD. It was $269 USD at MicroCenter (a small chain in the NE U.S.) I can't see any problem pixels, and I purchased MicroCenter's 2 year extended warranty, which they say will give me a refund if any dead pixels show up later on.

    However, it took a while to get it working. I don't fault the monitor itself, though it doesn't come with a meaningful manual. I didn't initially use the right kind of DVI cable. It requires the dual-link version to do this resolution. Also, when I tried the HDMI cable they provided, the NVIDIA would only see the monitor as capable of 1920x1080. But, that may have been the fault of my Nvidia Quadro FX 580 video card.

    I have a serious problem with BricsCAD now, it reports that, "Hardware rendering is not available on this machine", so it switches to software rendering. I had the hardware rendering before, so I don't know what caused it to break. The way it is now, working with a 3D model is not really viable. Any rendered view takes a few seconds to complete, and panning and zooming first converts the drawing to be extremely blocky. This happens in both 2k and 1920x1080 resolution.

    The company I work for also now wants me to upgrade my Win 7 Pro to Windows 10. The Nvidia card is supposed to be compatible according to their web site. But, now I look upon the upgrade with trepidation.

    -Joe

  • I found the issue with hardware rendering. When I had changed the resolution to be 2k, I had also reduced the number of colors to be 16bits., thinking that 32bits may be too much for the system to keep up a the 2k resolution. Changing it back to 32bit color re-enabled the hardware rendering. The opposite of what I would have expected.

    -Joe

  • Given the nature of CAD work, if you can afford it, it makes sense to invest in the best monitors on the market. Utilizing the most advanced technology at your disposal can ensure your work is the best it can be. Soon enough 4K may become the established standard, so getting comfortable with the technology now will set you up for the future.

    https://techradar.com/news/best-4k-monitors
    https://videoproc.com/edit-4k-video/4k-resolution.htm

  • @simona07114452 said:
    Utilizing the most advanced technology at your disposal can ensure your work is the best it can be.
    Soon enough 4K may become the established standard, so getting comfortable with the technology now will set you up for the future.

    The problem with 4k was that the software was not initially designed to work with such a high resolution. Icons being too small was the biggest problem.

    In general, people on the cutting edge do pay a price premium. And even if cost is not an issue, new technology can take a little time for problems to really show themselves and to be fixed. So, being on the cutting edge has multiple issues that causes me to want to avoid it. Though, I do think that 4K is mature enough now to be jumping on board.

    -Joe

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